Downtown Greeley Historic District
Downtown Greeley Historic District

Historic Greeley nominated the Downtown Historic District in 2002 to bring historic preservation incentives and protections to Greeley’s first commercial district. The multi-block district was approved and established on the local register with no opposition from any of the dozens of property owners within the district.

Weld County Garage Sign
Weld County Garage Sign

A significant downtown landmark on the local register, the 1940s-era neon sign was spared from demolition in the expansion of Weld County government parking lots. Historic Greeley brokered the deal between the city and county governments and the owners to de-list the sign, move it to the new car dealership location, and re-designate it on the local historic register.

POW Pillars of Camp 202
POW Pillars of Camp 202

When this last vestige of the World War II prisoner of war camp west of Greeley was threatened by the expansion of Highway 34, Historic Greeley rallied government and private groups to move the masonry bases to a nearby highway pull-out and designate them to the Greeley Historic Register.

Hillside Center Sign
Hillside Center Sign

Historic Greeley spearheaded this nomination to the local historic register to preserve and protect this icon of Greeley’s 1950s post-war, modern commercial architecture.

Cranford Neighborhood Home & Garden Tour
Cranford Neighborhood Home & Garden Tour

This 2010 event raised thousand of dollars to assist the Cranford Neighborhood in its legal effort to establish a historic district in this residential neighborhood. The district, ultimately denied by the City Council, opened several of its most significant homes and gardens to hundreds of Greeley residents appreciative of the Craftsman-era architecture.

Southard-Gillespie House Tour
Southard-Gillespie House Tour

In 2014 Historic Greeley featured a tour of the city’s finest historic home, exhibiting the the exquisite 1907 interiors. The home, preserved by the continuous ownership of Greeley’s prominent Southard and Gillespie family, was one of the most significant of those designed by female architect Bessie Smith, a rarity at the turn of the 20th century.